Liliane Yidan

Can women ever be recognized as auteurs?

On my daily aimless perusing of IMDb I stumble upon article and article about all the celebrated directors of our time, and user compiled lists of “greatest directors ever.”  One thing I found that all these lists tend to have in common is that all of these “legendary” directors are men.  And not to mention when you google the terms “greatest directors” you’re immediately met with a scrolling banner of only white men.

via twodollarcinema.blogspot.com
from google image search of “greatest directors” via twodollarcinema.blogspot.com

In one of my film courses we were asked if we could name a female director and only about two or three students in my class of thirty could utter a name.

I’m not sure if this problem is seemingly glaring to anyone outside of the entertainment industry, since the audience only extends itself as far as viewing the final product.  But that still does not lessen the severity of this issue of inequality.  And to say that this is only an issue of the entertainment industry is looking at only a fraction of the entire problem.

The history of film is being taught to celebrate only these specific figures, without any room or consideration of greatness for someone else (namely a woman).

Women have been making movies for just as long as men have been, but that fact goes buried beneath the repeated and tired sentiments of praise for the same male directors.  The lack of discussion of women directors only continues to solidify a stigma against women being directors.

The assumption that women haven’t been directing movies just gives an underlying impression of amateurism and displacement in their work.

If a woman’s place isn’t in the director’s seat, then it must be a man’s.

Much like the rest of our textbooks, a missed opportunity for female recognition always seems to be a symptom of our society’s study of history and art.

And if women aren’t immediately recognized as directors, how can women ever be recognized as auteurs?

There are many barriers for women to be successfully recognized and celebrated as being innovative in creating films without being discredited and even labeled as an amateur filmmaker just because they aren’t male.  And let’s face it, it’s only because women as a whole gender have never had any experience professionally directing and even if they did those films would only be “chick movies”! (cue eye-roll).

To be plain, without any hinge of satire, I’m so tired of only celebrating white male directors as geniuses and auteurs.

Sure, their work is innovative and different, but can we take the same amount of time to appreciate female (as well as people of color) directors just as much?


Featured image: Sofia Coppola by Liliane Yidan

Peyton Fulford

On the subject of the female body and lipstick feminism.

In my sophomore year of college I took a course called “The Philosophy of Feminism.”  Many or perhaps nearly all of the texts we read had been written by baby-boom era liberal white feminist philosophers.

I have no inherent problems or objections with reading these texts, however my only argument against this method of teaching is the lack of diversity in both the authors and their ideas.

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